Category poetry

A High School English Teacher Grades Famous Writers

E. E. Cummings (B-) “Edward. You should a good deal of creativity and independence of mind but spelling conventions exist for a reason.” Shakespeare (C+) “Bill. I really liked some of your work, especially the play about the failson who has a thing for his mom and the two young lovers but you tend to […]

So much depends upon a green wheel barrow

so much depends upon a green wheel barrow glazed with rain water beside the virgin mary William Carlos Rogouski

A Short Haiku For Bill Gates

In light of Bill Gates’ recent comments and the fact that its a cultural given that we hand free things to billionaires, I’ve written a haiku just for him. While I’ve inverted the normal 5-7-5 format, I think this poem still embodies the spirit of concision that animates the form. Without further ado: You have […]

The Robbers (1781)

If France gave us the greatest revolution, then Germany has given us the greatest revolutionaries, not only Luther, but Karl Marx and Ludwig Von Beethoven. In 1771, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote a short epistolary novel called The Sorrows of Young Werther. The revised edition would come out in 1787, only two years before the […]

Springsteen is Langston Hughes Turned Inside Out

I found this interview rather interesting, especially this line. “In my songs, the spiritual part, the hope part, is in the choruses. The blues and your daily realities are in the details of the verses.” https://www.npr.org/2019/03/26/706566556/bruce-springsteen-born-in-the-usa-american-anthem In Langston Hughes’s poem Let America be America, the (ultimately hollow) patriotic cheerleading is in the verses. The recognition […]

John Keats Died at 25

I didn’t understand Keats when I was 25. I was too strong, too healthy, too oblivious of my own mortality to understand the poetry of a man dying of tuberculosis. But now in middle age I finally understand what he felt when he saw the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum and fell into despair […]

A Man Called Ove: Celebrating the Use of Space in Swedish Cinema

What are we beyond our memories? It was just after having a petty argument with the florist, an ignorant teen as she was that Ove first exposes the dimensions of his existence. Grieved by the death of the only love of his life, Sonja, we see him dissipating his space by magnifying his trivialities. A […]

The Avant-Garde, Zeenat Aman

The cinema of the 70s is often termed as an era that marveled the art of pop culture reorientation. A decade that immersed itself in the chaos of coming of age screenplay and ever inspired music ensemble, the flights of imagination was anything but predictable. It was during this period that Hindi cinema saw the […]

From Renee Smith to Sita Devi: Retrieving the Forgotten Enchantress of Silent Era

Indian cinema had birthed a fair share of visionaries even before the beginning of what later came to be termed as the Golden era. Under the reigns of the British Raj, certain Indian artists thrived upon the offerings that colonial engagements with art had to offer and used the political situation of the period to […]

Emmanuelle Riva: The Francesca da Rimini of French Cinema

Many American street preachers will tell you that they get most of their converts from hecklers. Unlike people who walk by your fire and brimstone sermon without comment, hecklers are passionate, engaged. Even if they only want to prove you wrong, they’re still interested in what you have to say. In Jean-Pierre Melville’s criminally neglected […]